Around Britain: Wandering around Wick


Our campsite was on the banks of the River Wick. Gulls and ducks were nesting on islands in the middle and there are riverside walks

with some flowers still in bloom.

We walked with into town: passing some street art done by a local youth group

Emerging by the bridge you are opposite the smallest street in the world: the 2.06 metres and one door of Ebenezer Place. Pulteney lies to the south of the river and was not united with the Burgh of Wick until 1901. It is the home of Pulteney Distillery which dates from 1825.

Before this, there was a meal mill and brewery on the same site powered by water from Loch Hemphrigg which lies to the south; piped by the Telford water scheme. The town did not get piped water until 1845 after the cholera epidemic of 1836. Down at the harbour we walked past the South Pier

Herring fishing was a big industry in the 19th and early 20th century. The biggest recorded catch in one day was on 23rd August 1864 when 926 boats landed 24,000 crans of herring. The gutters and processors dealt with over 24 million herring in a single day. At its peak, Wick was the biggest herring port in the world. In the 1930s the industry began to decline and ceased in the Second World War. After a brief revival in the 1950s, it declined again and now there are only occasional white fish landings and some crabs, lobsters and clams mostly for the European market. Aside from leisure boats, there were several support vessels and company offices for the extensive wind farms we saw offshore yesterday.

A cannon sits by the harbour near the old herring market. It had been presented to the harbour trust in 1881 to act as a fog signal after the death of many fishermen at sea. The gun was moved to its current position in 2012.

Telford planned the Pulteney harbour, town and bridge; building beginning in 1807, much of the new housing was for people displaced by the clearances. The layout of new roads was planned. The Wick-Thurso road opened in 1813. In Albert Square we spotted something not seen in any other town we have visited: streetlights being washed.

Back across the river, we had coffee in the High Street where like many other towns in the UK, there were empty shops. I had intended to spend some time in the afternoon walking along the riverside but heavy showers of rain arrived so that was shelved, as was a coastal walk to the Trinkie Swimming Pool and Old Wick Castle which we will visit on the way out tomorrow.

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